Category Archives: Craft Tutorial

Sew. Happy. Quilt. QAL Fireflies Block #6 – Guest Tutorial Melissa of SewBitterSweet!

Did you want to leave a link on Manic Monday Linky Party? It’s still open!

I’m really thrilled to present Block #6 of the Sew. Happy. Quilt. Quilt Along! My friend Melissa agreed to do a tutorial for the Fireflies block, and I’m sure you are going to love it! If you’re wondering what I’m on about, here’s the Quilt Along information page. Most of the blocks are fairly simple, so anyone can join anytime.

Hi Everyone! My name is Melissa and I blog at Sew BitterSweet Designs. Last year I worked on a Vintage Christmas Sampler quilt and one of the blocks was the Fireflies block. When Jenna asked me if I would like to do the tutorial for her QAL – I was tickled and honored at the same time!

So here we go!

Let’s start with the cutting instructions:

Usually when I make HSTs I cut my squares larger, but for this block, I find my results are more accurate if I cut to these measurements and starch like crazy. (If you’re nervous about that, you can cut them 1/8″ larger than called for and then trim down. Eg cut the large red square to 7″ instead of 6 7/8″)

All seams: 1/4 inch

Start by Assembling your 6 blue & white HSTs – I like to chain piece. Sew section after section without cutting your threads until you are done.Then cut them all apart – for newer quilters – this will save you lots of time.

Next – take 2 of your HSTs and assemble your large triangle sections (make 2):

Next – take your large red triangles and assemble two 6.5″ blocks:

(Hint) – place the pieces right sides together – line up the points and sew – then trim down to 6.5″

Next assemble two 4-patch blocks:

Layout your block and sew together – voila – you’re done!

If you have any questions – don’t hesitate to ask! melissa (at) sewbittersweetdesigns (dot) com.

PS. If you are interested – I have a giveaway on my blog right now from Fat Quarter Shop – stop by and enter!

See? Wasn’t that easy? Ok, maybe not easy, but definitely not as hard as you might have thought. When you get your block done, pop a pic in the Flickr group!

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Posted in Craft Tutorial, Quilt Block Tutorials, Sew. Happy. Quilt. QAL, sewing tutorial, Tutorial Tuesday, Tutorials, UK craft blog, UK quilt blog, UK sewing blog | Tagged , , , | 7 Comments

Tutorial Tuesday: Churn Dash Redux {Quilt Block}

Did you leave a link on Manic Monday Linky Party? No? Well, you better get over there right now and do so!

Psst….Have you made something from a SewHappyGeek tutorial? Why not add it to the I’m a SewHappyGeek too Flickr page?

Today I’m sharing a quilt block tutorial. I’m sure there’s a true ‘accepted’ name for this block, but I have no idea what it is, so I’m calling it Churn Dash Redux. It’s a great block to use for a virtual quilting bee, and in fact this tutorial is for the benefit of my lovely bee mates in the {Sew Bee It} bee run by my good friend Shanna of Fiber of All Sorts. (If you want to print out this tutorial, one is available through Google Docs. PLEASE read the terms at the bottom of it before you print it. I’m really tired of having my tutorials stolen.)

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011

So, what you’ll need for a block:

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011

  • 1} 4.5″ x 4.5″ square for the center
  • 4} 2.5″ x 4.5″ (white) pieces for the flying geese units
  • 8} 2.5″ x 2.5″ squares for the flying geese units
  • 4} 2.5″ x 4.5″ pieces to go next to the flying geese units
  • 4} 5″ x 5″ squares for the corners (2 of each colour)
Before I begin, I have a tip to share with you. Do you know what spray starch is? Some of you already know to use it when you’re piecing, but for those who don’t, let me tell you: It IS the best product to use to ensure you get perfect seam allowances and perfect piecing. I spray my fabric so much it’s nearly stiff before I sew with it. It took my piecing from ‘okay’ to nearly always perfect with no other effort. No, it does not gum up your needle or machine. So go get some!
(I press all my seams open to prevent bulk)
The first thing to do is make the HSTs (half square triangles) for your corner pieces. Take 2 of your 5″ x 5″ squares (the white ones in this case), and on the back, draw a line in pencil from one corner diagonally to the other one. Then place them RST with your other squares and sew two seams, 1/4″ on either side of the diagonal line. ***I am paranoid, so I draw a middle diagonal line, then I draw two additional lines 1/4″ away from the middle one, so I know when I’m sewing that I’m getting it just right.***

©, Copyright J C Excell, 2011

Now carefully cut down your middle diagonal line, press the seams open and voila! HSTs! Do the same for both sets of squares.

© Copyright J C Excell, 2011

Once you’ve opened and pressed them, it’s time to trim. Trim them to exactly 4.5″ x 4.5″ and set aside.

© Copyright J C Excell, 2011

Now we’re going to make our flying geese units. Take your little 2.5″ x 2.5″ squares and draw a line in pencil (on the WRONG side!) diagonally from one corner to the opposite one, as shown above. ***Some people are so good they don’t have to draw a line. I am not one of those people. If you are, feel free to stitch away!***
Now lay your square RST on your white (or whatever you choose) 4.5″ x 2.5″ Flying Geese unit piece. Pay attention to the placement of the line in the left side of the pic. Sew down that line, press it over, then trim that excess corner. Make sense?

© Copyright J C Excell, 2011

Now do the same again on the other side of your white piece – again, pay close attention to the direction the penciled line is going in.

© Copyright J C Excell, 2011

Now that your FG units are finished, you can sew them to your 2.5″ x 4.5″ prints (or whatever you chose). Sew those prints together on the side of the point. See pic above.

© Copyright J C Excell, 2011

So, now it’s time for the final assembly. Do you like my iron? I love it. But it is funny looking! Anyway, you’ll want to assemble your block in the way I’ve shown above. Make 3 pieces, then sew those 3 together to get the final quilt block.
And here’s what you can make using that block:
This is a little mock up I did on my EQ7 just to see what it looked like. Cute, no?

© Copyright J C Excell, 2011. You are welcome to use any SewHappyGeek tutorial for personal use. You are even welcome to make a couple to sell, but you are not given permission to use my pictures or my words without giving me credit and linking back to the original. You are NEVER allowed to copy an entire tutorial or post.
Sometimes my pictures have my family in them and they are never intended for public use. Also, I work very hard to provide free tutorials for my lovely readers, and anyone copying or selling my tutorials is guilty of copyright infringement.
This website is protected by Copyscape and is checked regularly, which means I WILL find you.

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Posted in Craft Tutorial, sewing tutorial, Tutorial Tuesday, Tutorials, UK craft blog, UK quilt blog | Tagged , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Tutorial Tuesday: Mini Quilt/Pillow

Wow! It seems like aaaaages since I could be bothered to write a tutorial I had a good idea for a tutorial. Before we dive in I’d like to remind you that Manic Monday’s Linky Party is still going on, so go link up!

Also, my Bee friend Kris has a Summer Mug Rug Challenge going on and would be delighted if you could go over there and vote for your favourite mug rug. All you have to do is click the photo you like and enter VOTE in the comments. I’m sure the gals who made the mug rugs would really appreciate this recognition of their hard work :) Plus my mate Kelly entered some really cute ones, and they’re worth a look for sure!

Ok, on to the tutorial. Here’s what we’ll be making:

It’s 18″ x 18″ and super easy to whip up. It was originally intended to be a pillow cover but once I made it I liked it so much I decided to hand quilt it and make it a wall hanging. So you can do whatever you want with it. If you want to make a smaller one (about 14″ square), I’ll give you the recipe for that, too. And if you want to print it, I’ve made a printer friendly version via Google Documents.

Like a knitting pattern I’ll be putting the numbers for the smaller one first, and the larger size will be shown in parentheses, like so: 14 (17) squares. Get it?

You’ll need:

  • 27 (54) 3″ x 3″ squares of different prints/colours/whatever
  • 1 (1) 7.5″ x 7.5″ fussy cut panel (mine has two birds on it)
  • 15″ x 15″ (19″ x 19″) square of wadding
  • backing a bit bigger than the wadding and front
  • binding: 62″ (78″) of whatever width you want. If you’re making a pillow front you won’t need binding.
  • sewing machine, rotary cutter, mat, ruler, etc. I SERIOUSLY recommend spray starching the squares to keep everything precise and lined up perfectly.
Right. Take your squares and start sewing them up in groups of 9:
When that’s done, cut them in half, then in half again, as shown below:
You will have some left over. That’s ok, you can use them on the back if you want.
Now arrange them like so (or until you’re happy):
If you are making the smaller version, you’ll only have this:
Now baste, quilt and bind! I’m still quilting mine – I bought some lovely perle cottons at the Festival of Quilts so I’m doing it by hand.
If you wanted to make a larger version here are the numbers:
  • 4″ squares yield 5″ finished blocks.
  • 5″ squares yield 6.5″ finished blocks.
  • 6″ squares yield 8″ finished blocks.
By the way, does anyone want to see the pics from Festival of Quilts? I took a poop ton, although the lighting was AWFUL for shooting photos. I’m hoping I’ll get a few gems out of the 400+ that I took.
And we’ll end with my new, stricter copyright notice. I’m sorry it sounds so pugnacious, but I found a French blog that had stolen my tutorial (including the copyright notice? WTF?) and had to complain to Google to get it taken down. Of course there was no comment facility, no email address so I couldn’t bitch the person out. And of course all the other posts are stolen tutorials as well. You’re welcome to track down the original authors and send them over to the Google copyright infringement site.  So I’ve had to expand the notice. Sorry. You know how it is.


© Copyright J C Excell, 2011. You are welcome to use any SewHappyGeek tutorial for personal use. You are even welcome to make a couple to sell, but you are not given permission to use my pictures or my words without giving me credit and linking back to the original. You are NEVER allowed to copy an entire tutorial or post.
Sometimes my pictures have my family in them and they are never intended for public use. Also, I work very hard to provide free tutorials for my lovely readers, and anyone copying or selling my tutorials is guilty of copyright infringement.
This website is protected by Copyscape and is checked regularly, which means I WILL find you.

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Posted in Craft Tutorial, Tutorial Tuesday, Tutorials, UK craft blog, UK quilt blog, UK sewing blog | Tagged , , , | 12 Comments

Feature Friday and Win $30 For Fabric! Mug Rug Challenge

Hi everyone, this is going to be short and sweet as I have a horrible cold and a tongue ulcer simultaneously and want to go eat ice cream for dinner. Tomorrow we’ll be announcing the winners of the Stashtacular massive giveaway, so make sure you check in!

And I also want to mention the Summer Mug Rug Challenge that my friend Kris Garst is hosting over on Facebook. Click here to read the rules. All you have to do is join the group, and when that’s sorted you simply add pictures of mug rugs you’ve made for the chance to win a $30 gift certificate to THE FABRIC STORE OF YOUR CHOICE!!!! Woohoo! I’ll be asking for votes next week ;)

Mary over at Craft Buds published this fantastic, easy to understand tutorial for her dress/skirt. Seriously, everything about the tute is good – informative photos, good instructions – If you’ve been hot this week and want a maxi skirt, go check this out!

Wendy from The Crafter’s Apprentice felted the solar system from a kit available on etsy – isn’t it cute?

And I’d love to give a shout out to my lovely friend Ruth over at Cherry Coloured Twist, who ordered labels from Spoonflower – They’re smaller than the ones I ordered and now I’m convinced that I too NEED smaller labels for smaller stuff (doll quilt swap, mug rug swap, etc?). Aren’t they gorgeous? Sigh. If you want to make some, read Julie Herman’s VERY useful post here, and read my post here to avoid making the mistakes I made. Seriously, read them BOTH!

Well, I’m out. Back tomorrow for the massive giveaway post – there are going to be a TON of winners!

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Posted in craft linky party results, Craft Tutorial, easy skirt tutorial, fabric giveaway, Feature Friday, Features, Linky Party Results, Stashtacular!, UK craft blog, UK quilt blog, UK sewing blog | Tagged | 10 Comments

Stashtacular Tutorial Tuesday: Pleated Hostess Apron (& Giveaway)

Welcome to the 2nd week of Stashtacular! There’s a lot goin on, so go check it out.

There’s still time if you’d like to get in on Manic Monday linky party and the Jelly Roll Giveaway from Fat Quarter Shop.

This lovely Pleated Hostess Apron tutorial is my contribution to this week’s Stashtacular celebrations, and I really hope you make one and love it – and if you do, and add a picture to the Flickr group, you’ll be entered to win some really lovely prizes!

You will need:

  • (Main Fabric) 60 cm or 24 in length of fabric for apron front, waistband and ties
  • (Accent Fabric) 75 cm or 30 in length of fabric for apron border and back

1. Cut out:

  • 49 x 91 cm (20″ x 36″) length of Accent Fabric for the back, plus a 13 x 91 cm piece of Accent Fabric for the apron’s border.
  • Then out of the Main Fabric, cut a 39 x 91 cm (15″ x 36″) piece for apron front, plus a 15 cm by 70 cm (6″ x 27.5″) length for the waistband. For the ties, cut 2 lengths, 11 cm x 60 cm (4.5″ x 24″)

Seam Allowance is 1.5cm (about 3/4″) unless otherwise noted. RST=Right Sides Together, RSO=Right Sides Out, SA=Seam Allowance.

2. With RST, sew one long side of apron border to one long side of Main Fabric apron front.

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011

3. Then place the Apron front and back RST and sew along the bottom and sides, but leave open the top (I accidentally sewed it shut, and it’s not a really big deal either way.). Now you can fold it all so it’s RSO, and edgestitch along the 3 edges. Optional: Stitch in the ditch of your apron border.

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011

4. Now mark the top middle (on the front of the apron), and make a mark 12 cm (about 4.75″) away from the center on both sides, like in the picture:

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011

5. Fold each side in to make a pleat and baste as in the pictures below (I also ‘basted’ the pleat with a 0-length zig zag stitch because it was bugging me when it kept coming apart) - If you are really confused about making the pleat, check out my Pleat Tutorial Google Doc:

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011 - I basted the pleat in place with a zig zag stitch for stability during construction, but it's optional.

On the other side of the apron, the pleat you have just made will show as a different kind of pleat. See bottom pics to get what I’m talking about.

6. Take your ties and press them RST down the length, and to make turning them out easier, place a length of ribbon next to the crease. Make sure the end of the ribbon peeks out of one short side so that your stitches will ‘catch’ it when you sew:

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011

7. Sew down one short side and the long side of the tie, then use the ribbon to turn it out easily:

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011

Cut the ribbon carefully at the end and keep it for another tie! And press the ties into shape. Then set them aside for now.

8. Take the waistband fabric and run a stitch 1.5 cm (about 3/4″ or so) down one long side and then press at that mark:

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011

9. What we’re doing here is adding the waistband to the apron as if it were a huge piece of bias binding.

Now line up the unstitched long edge of the waisband with the top edge of the apron front and sew (using a 1.5 cm (3/4″) SA). Make sure your stitching is straight, and if it’s not, stitch again until it is:

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011

Here’s what it will look like pulled up:

Now this is going to sound a little odd, but take the waistband and fold it RST on top of itself and press the fold:

10. Now flip the waistband back up so its right side is facing you. Pin and stitch the ties to the waistband with unfinished edges pointing outwards, making sure the ties are as close as possible to that crease you just made:

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011

11. Now, you’re going to fold the waistband lengthways so your edges meet, like in the picture. Note that the ties are tucked up inside.

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011

12. Draw a line marking the outside edge of the apron front like in the picture:

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011

13. Baste using a long stitch length along that line. Then turn it all RSO to make sure it fits over the apron front smoothly. If there is extra waistband hanging out, stitch again even closer. Once you’re happy, use a short stitch length to ‘lock it in’ and trim those edges and corners!

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011

15. Flip the waistband RSO and you can either slipstitch the back by hand, or machine stitch along the edge. I chose to topstitch along the top of the waistband as well.

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011

That’s it! You’re done, and you’ve got a lovely new apron to give as a gift or keep for yourself!

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011. You created this pleat on the other side when you basted in your pleat as instructed above. Does that make sense? Trust me, it will work. Or email me, jenna (at) sewhappygeek.co.uk


© Copyright J C Excell, 2011. You are welcome to use any SewHappyGeek tutorial for personal use. You are even welcome to make a couple to sell, but you are not given permission to use my pictures or my words without giving me credit and linking back to the original. Sometimes my pictures have my family in them and they are never intended for public use. Also, I work very hard to provide free tutorials for my lovely readers, and anyone copying or selling my tutorials is guilty of copyright infringement.

 

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Posted in apron tutorial, Craft Tutorial, half apron tutorial, Tutorial Tuesday, Tutorials, UK craft blog, UK quilt blog, UK sewing blog | Tagged , , , , , | 10 Comments

Tutorial Tue: Sweet Baby Dreams Quilt

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011

Welcome to Stashtacular! We’re on a fabric diet, and are gearing up to swap our old fabrics for new!

Stashtacular
If you’d like the tutorial for my Sweet Baby Dreams quilt, you can click here to access it.  It’s a super easy quilt to piece, perfect for the beginner, or really quick for the more experienced. The reason I’ve done it as a Google document is so you can print it if you want to.  If you make a quilt top before 5 August, add it to the Flickr group to be entered to win lots of grand prizes.

Please go sign up for this week’s giveaway of a $25 gift certificate for free fabric from 1Choice4Quilting over at Blue Bird Sews who is hosting this week’s Stashtacular celebrations!

And don’t forget, you need to be thinking about whether you’d like to join my new virtual quilting bee, Sew Bee Blissful. It’s ok if you’re a bee beginner; we’ll all be friendly and helpful, even if you’re a bit scared of quilting!

Sew Bee Blissful


© J C Excell, 2011

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Posted in Craft Tutorial, Finished Quilts, Giveaways, Quilt Pattern, Tutorial Tuesday, Tutorials, UK craft blog, UK quilt blog, UK sewing blog | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

Tutorial Tuesday: Quilted Coasters and Giveaway Announcement!

Hey, make sure you come back tomorrow for this fabulous giveaway:

© Copyright J C Excell, 2011. Wednesday June 29 starts the next follower giveaway - 6 FQs and some chocolate and sweets!

If you want to link up to Manic Monday, please do so! And if you haven’t heard about Stashtacular, I suggest you get in on the fun!

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011

We have this really ugly set of coasters in the living room that I want to throw away. I must have thought they were attractive when I bought them many years ago, but now I just think they’re ugly. And Buzz ALWAYS puts his drink on a coaster, even though none of the tables are that nice. And his bedside table is actually a metal filing cabinet, which I’m pretty sure wouldn’t suffer at all if he put drinks straight onto it.

So here was the conversation (a long, long time ago in a galaxy far, far away):

Me: You know those coasters in the living room? The ugly ones? Can I just throw them out or give them to a charity shop because they’re embarrassing me.

B: More embarrassing than all the other shit piled up everywhere? Like your 80 pairs of shoes?

Me: Shut up. You know what I mean.

B: What will we replace them with?

Me: Um. Nothing? None of our surfaces are nice enough to need protecting?

B: (smiling like he’s got something I will want) Ok, you can throw them away AFTER you make some new ones. You can’t buy new ones.

Me: Hmmmmm. I’ll have to think about that.

Because, my good friends, I DO have lots of other sewing that needs done more than coasters. Like, I need to start cutting and sewing my 3rd pattern quilt, and write the tutorial for #2. Plus Stashtacular tutorials, and I just took on the webpage of Romsey Quilters too. So I’m busy.

But once I forced myself to make one, I realised how instant the gratification is on these little babies, and I wanted to share the endorphins with you!

What you’ll need:

  • scraps of fabric and some squares of batting or flannelette.
  • basic sewing stuff

Decide how big you want your finished coasters to be and cut a piece of batting or even flannelette that size. Flannelette works well because it’s not as thick as batting and is cheaper. It actually does a pretty good job in coasters.

I made mine 4″, 4.5″ and even 5″ to experiment with finding what I liked. I think I like the bigger ones better as they show more of your hard work off to the world. :)

So just sew your scraps together and trim them down to the size of your batting plus 1/4″ on each side for SA. (for a 4″ coaster, cut them 4.5″ square)

Stack the front and back together with right sides facing each other, then put your batting on top. Sew around the batting, leaving an opening of a couple of inches:

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011

 

Pin and sew that shut while you’re edgestitching the whole thing:

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011

 

Then try out all those free motion patterns you’re too scared to ruin a whole quilt with:

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011. Some random straight line quilting.

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011, Slightly less random straight line quilting.

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011, Square spiral.

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011, Here's the back of all 3 coasters I made.

Isn’t that easy? And now I can throw those coasters out by giving them to a charity shop. Everyone wins! If you make some, add them to the SewHappyGeek Flickr group!

© Copyright J C Excell, 2011. You are welcome to use any SewHappyGeek tutorial for personal use. You are even welcome to make a couple to sell, but you are not given permission to use my pictures or my words without giving me credit and linking back to the original. Sometimes my pictures have my family in them and they are never intended for public use. Also, I work very hard to provide free tutorials for my lovely readers, and anyone copying or selling my tutorials is guilty of copyright infringement.

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Posted in Craft Tutorial, Tutorial Tuesday, UK craft blog, UK quilt blog, UK sewing blog | Tagged , | 11 Comments

Mini-Giveaway Winner and Feature Friday

Thank you to all 30 people who read yesterday’s post all the way through and commented to test my new commenting facilities! I’m still tweaking it, but it looks like it’s doing a fairly good job – only a couple of people got erroneously sent to the ‘spam’ folder.

The winner was Debbe from Pieces to Love, and I’ve sent her an email already. I really love my free WordPress plug-in that allows me to decide which posts are contests and how many random winners I want. At the touch of a button it does all the random work for me.

And you’ll be wanting to come back next week because the Follower Giveaway will start – I have decided to include genuine Cadbury’s chocolate and fabric in this one as those are my two favourite things.

So here are the week’s features:

Lindsey from Craft Buds shared how to sew reusable sandwich bags which look quite useful.

Karen from Sew Much 2 Luv shared a tutorial for these little zipper pouches that look like they’d make brilliant pencil cases. (Is the UK the only country that requires school kids to have pencil cases? We go through at least 2 per year.)

Felicity of Felicity Quilts made this Helen Keller quote quilt as part of the Kona Solids challenge – isn’t is lovely?!

My lovely blog friend Bonnie of Wonderfully Awkward wrote a tutorial for this wristlet with a secret zipper pocket.

And you guys have to check out Zombie Leah’s tutorial for painting with yarn – it would be a brilliant activity to do with your kids!

Suburbs Mama shared a tutorial for this easy elasticated waist knit skirt that takes way less than an hour to sew!

Well, that’s all the time I have! Gotta go write tutorials now,

 


© J C Excell, 2011

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Posted in craft linky party, craft linky party results, Craft Tutorial, easy skirt tutorial, Feature Friday, Features, Giveaways, Linky Party Results, UK craft blog, UK quilt blog, UK sewing blog | 5 Comments

Tutorial Tuesday: Mug Rug with Free PDF Template by me!

****UPDATE: the links to the mug pdf have been updated, and should go to the correct place now. If they don’t, leave a comment below and I’ll email it to you ASAP****

Ok, here’s another mug rug tutorial. I am very sorry it’s so late – it was the pdf part that I had trouble with. But now I think I’ve sorted it out, so if you want it, click here to get the free pdf template.
Here’s what I came up with:

Here’s how you make it:
First, for the front, you’ll need 3 strips, 2 for the side and 1 for the bottom. And you’ll need a piece of fabric measuring 7″ by 9″. See pic below:

I used leftover bits from a jelly roll quilt I made, sewing them together until I had about 30″ length, then I rotary cut them. I also did a 11″ length for the back, too.
For the coffee mug, I used the template I made, using Bond a Web Lite. I cut the pieces, then played with the placement of them all.
You’ll notice on the template that there’s a dotted line on the top of the mug – that’s where we’re going to put our ‘coffee’.
Once you’re happy with the layout, you can start stitching it down. If you are super nervous about your freehand skills, you can use thread which matches your fabric pieces, as little ‘mess-ups’ won’t be as obvious. Me, I like to live dangerously (and it’s all practice, right?), so I went straight for dark brown:

 

Using my free motion foot, I went from side to side, filling in the whole area with thread. I also went round all the edges 2 or 3 times:

 

After that I just sewed all the pieces together:

 

And made the back, too:

I basted it all together with 505 basting spray, and quilted it with stipple squiggles around the mug and straight lines in the strips:

 

I trimmed it using a big square ruler and a rotary cutter, and put the binding on. If you need help with binding, here is the link to my binding tutorial.

If you make one, I’d love for you to email me with a picture: Jenna (at) sewhappygeek.co.uk

Or you can post it to the flickr group! And if you make one for the mug rug swap, here’s the special flickr group for that!

Hope this was useful!


Copyright Notice:
© J C Excell, 2011 You are welcome to use any SewHappyGeek tutorial for personal use. You are even welcome to make a couple to sell, but you are not given permission to use my pictures or my words without giving me credit and linking back to the original. Sometimes my pictures have my family in them and they are never intended for public use. Also, I work very hard to provide free tutorials for my lovely readers, and anyone copying or selling my tutorials is guilty of copyright infringement.

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Posted in Craft Tutorial, Mug Rug Tutorial, Tutorial Tuesday, Tutorials, UK craft blog | 26 Comments