Tag Archives: mug rug tutorial

Double Tutorial Tue: Foundation Heart Mug Rug & Sew. Happy. Quilt. Block #9

Psst…did you want to leave a link on Manic Monday Linky Party? You still can! And don’t forget to enter my awesome giveaway, which ends Thursday! At least 3 fabulous prizes to be given away!

Woohoo! I’ve got 2 tutorials to share with you today! One is the next block in my Sew. Happy. Quilt. Quilt AlongChurn Dash Redux, which can be found here, and the other is one I posted last week on my good friend Melissa’s blog, SewBitterSweet Designs. She has an AMAZING array of Valentine’s Day themed tutorials in her Valentine’s Day Showcase celebration - so go check the others out!

My daughter Savi is pretty enamoured with this mug rug, and she’s always so good and cheerful that this Valentine’s Day I’m giving her this special handmade gift. I’m really lucky to have such a great and supportive family, and it’s so nice to have a full time cheerleader in my corner. Life hasn’t always been easy for the two of us, but I think our closeness has given us both strength when we needed it most – and there really were times when my 10 year old daughter held me together. I’ve always treated her like an adult and it seems to have helped her become a clever and brave tween. Thanks, Savi. Mummy loves you!

Ingredients:

  • one printed heart pdf pattern from Carol Doak’s free patterns page (just scroll down till you see Crazy Patch Heart)
  • OPTIONAL: an 8″ x 8″ scrap of calico or thin white cotton fabric to make a foundation
  • assorted scraps for the heart foundation/paper piecing block
  • 4 strips of fabric 1.5″ x 6.5″
  • 2 strips of fabric 1.5″ x 10.5″
  • 2 strips of fabric 2″ x 10.5″
  • 2 strips of fabric 2″ x 11.5″
  • Wadding 12″ x 14″
  • Backing for 12″ x 14″
  • 55″ worth of binding (need a binding tute? No problem!)

Finished size: about 10″ x 12″ depending on how big the foundation pattern prints. Don’t freak out if it’s not exactly 6.5″ square. Mine wasn’t and I think it looks ok anyway. :)

Ok, right off the bat when you look at the next picture you’ll be wondering if I’ve gone crazy. Of course I have, but it has nearly nothing to do with the sewing. Nearly.

I take a class with a lovely lady named Jackie Sparks. She doesn’t have a blog but she’s the chair of my local quilt group, Romsey Quilters. (BTW I do their website too – that’s why it’s so crap). Anyway, she showed me a way to eliminate all the faff of paper piecing by turning it into foundation piecing. All you need is some masking tape, a ruler and a pencil and some calico.

As you can see, I’ve taped my printout down to my mat, then over it I’ve taped a big square of calico, which is so thin you can see right through it. (So it doesn’t add bulk!) Then you simply trace ALL the lines using a pencil and ruler. Make sure you do the outside 1/4″ lines so you have a seam allowance. And I promise you the extra effort is worth it – it makes life SO much easier!

So I’ve drawn all my lines and numbered the spaces in pencil too. That’s important. Do that now.

Clearly, if it’s numbered, we’ll start with #1. ***#s 1, 9, 10, 11 Cut a piece of fabric that’s larger than the space – it’s a tiny space so a square of whatever will do. Place it RIGHT SIDE UP on the BACK of the numbered side and pin in place. See how I’m holding it up to the light to make sure there is plenty of seam allowance on all sides? You should do that too.

Now I’ve cut a big piece for #2. I’ve place it RIGHT SIDE DOWN (Facing down) on top of the #1 piece. See how the only thing actually IN the #2 space is a tiny little seam allowance? That’s because we’ll be flipping it Right Side UP after sewing that line. Also you need to make sure that when you do flip and iron the square of fabric will cover all of the #2 space plus at least 1/4″.

Do what the picture says. Start stitching about 2 stitch lengths before, and stop about 2 stitch lengths after the line.

This is important. You MUST iron after every seam you sew. That keeps it crisp and sharp, which is why you’re doing a foundation in the first place.

Now fold back the calico and trim the seam allowance to 1/4″. MAKE SURE you don’t cut the calico!!!

Now we’re getting to larger pieces. Here’s how to deal with them: 1) Make sure you cut a piece large enough to cover #3 plus AT LEAST 1/4″ on all sides. Personally I cut much larger then trim down. 2) Place it face down on the front, positioning it so the seam allowance is roughly 1/4″ past the line between #’2 and #3. 3) Then pin the line to test your seam before you sew it. 4) Turn it so you’re looking at the numbered side and hold it up to the light as shown above to make sure that once you stitch the line, there is plenty of fabric to cover #3. In this case there’s more than enough.

5) Now reposition your pin so you’re not sewing it and you can sew that line between #1/#2 and #3. PRESS!!!

Here’s how it looks after you’ve added #4. I know it looks messy and awful, but you’ll trim so don’t worry about it. Just worry about the seams and making sure you have enough fabric. Just follow steps 1 through 5 as outlined above and you won’t go wrong.

Here it is after I sewed all the pieces. Doesn’t that look awful?

Here’s the back of that foundation piece. Now that looks all nice and neat, doesn’t it? AND NO TEARING (or tears!)!

Now you’re ready to trim the foundation along those outside lines and add your 2 6.5″ long strips to the sides. (Again, if yours printed out smaller, don’t fret. Just trim the edges of the strips and decide if you want to add more.)

Here she is all pieced, basted and quilted. I tried a fancy meandering heart FMQ. Some of it looks good, some of it looks like thread vomit as I showed you before. Now all you need to do is put the binding on and you’re good to go!


© Copyright J C Excell, 2011. You are welcome to use any SewHappyGeek tutorial for personal use. You are even welcome to make a couple to sell, but you are not given permission to use my pictures or my words without giving me credit and linking back to the original. You are NEVER allowed to copy an entire tutorial or post.
Sometimes my pictures have my family in them and they are never intended for public use. Also, I work very hard to provide free tutorials for my lovely readers, and anyone copying or selling my tutorials is guilty of copyright infringement.

Posted in Sew. Happy. Quilt. QAL, sewing tutorial, Tutorial Tuesday, Tutorials, UK craft blog, UK quilt blog, UK sewing blog | Tagged , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Tutorial Tuesday: Cheating Zig Zag Mug Rug

Hey, did you leave a link or two on Manic Monday Linky Party? Go do that now! Also, I found a whole bunch of awesome SALE bundles at JAQS fabrics - like 12 FQs for only $15!!! So go check out Q’s shop!

My friend and bee mate Cindy of Fluffy Sheep Quilting organised a Goodie Swap and I’ve been busy making my mug rugs, and I thought maybe you might like a tutorial for this:

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011

It’s 10.5″ by 8.5″ finished. I got the idea for this from Crazy Mom’s zig zag quilt tutorial. For this mug rug’s front you’ll need:

  • A- 1} 2.5″ x 1.5″
  • B- 1} 2.5″ x 1.5″ and 1} 5″ x 1.5″
  • C- 1} 5″ x 1.5″ and 1} 7.5″ x 1.5″
  • D- 1} 7.5″ x 1.5″ and 1} 10″ x 1.5″
  • E- 1} 10″ x 1.5″ and 1} 7.5″ x 1.5″
  • F 1} 7.5″ x 1.5″ and 1} 7.5″ x 1.5″ and 1} 2.5″ x 1.5″
  • G- 1} 7.5″ x 1.5″ and 5″ x 1.5″
  • H- 1} 5″ x 1.5″ and 2.5″ x 1.5″
  • I- 1} 2.5″ x 1.5″
  • J- 1} 2.5″ x 1.5″

©, Copyright J C Excell, 2011

Now, you need to sew those longer strips together. They get arranged in the logical way -
  • The two small A and B get sewn together on the long sides
  • B and C’s 5″ strips get sewn together
  • C and D’s 7.5″ strips get sewn together
  • D and E’s 10″ strips get sewn together
  • E and F’s 7.5″ strips get sewn together
  • F and G’s 7.5″ strips get sewn together
  • F’s 2.5″ strip gets sewn to J’s 2.5″ strip
  • G and H’s 5″ strips get sewn together
  • H and I’s 2.5″ strips get sewn together
Now you need to cut your long strips into 2.5″ long blocks:

© Copyright J C Excell 2011

Then it’s just a matter of lining them all up and sewing them together. I sew 4 little blocks together, then start sewing them into bigger pieces. But you can do whatever you’re comfortable with.

© Copyright J C Excell 2011

And here it is, all finished with pretty yellow binding:

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011

And here’s the back, complete with my new small quilt labels from Spoonflower. You can make your own too.

© Copyright, J C Excell 2011

If you make something from a SewHappyGeek tutorial, take a pic and add it to the SewHappyGeek Flickr group!

© Copyright J C Excell, 2011. You are welcome to use any SewHappyGeek tutorial for personal use. You are even welcome to make a couple to sell, but you are not given permission to use my pictures or my words without giving me credit and linking back to the original. You are NEVER allowed to copy an entire tutorial or post.
Sometimes my pictures have my family in them and they are never intended for public use. Also, I work very hard to provide free tutorials for my lovely readers, and anyone copying or selling my tutorials is guilty of copyright infringement.
This website is protected by Copyscape and is checked regularly, which means I WILL find you.

Posted in Mug Rug Tutorial, Tutorial Tuesday, Tutorials, UK craft blog, UK quilt blog, UK sewing blog | Tagged , , , | 16 Comments

Tutorial Tuesday: Hexy Mug Rug Tutorial

Did you miss Manic Monday Linky Party? Want to get in on our HUGE GIVEAWAY week – and go leave an entry to win a Jelly Roll of your choice from Fat Quarter Shop? FOLLOW THIS LINK!!! There are loads of ways to win this week!

So you want to get in on the hexie fun bandwagon? I don’t blame you. These little babies are sooo addictive – they’re perfect for when you’re waiting at the doctor’s, watching telly, ignoring your screaming kids, that kind of stuff. (My kid doesn’t scream anymore, thank goddess, but she frequently asks to buy apps on her iPod. Ugh.)

Anyhoo, I’ll get you started, ok? First of all, you’ll need to cut out your hexies, both paper and fabric. I use these Clover templates, tracing the ‘inner’ hexagon onto paper, and the ‘outer’ onto fabric. Then I cut them all out.

Now I’ll show you how to baste them:

Take a paper hexagon and a fabric one. Fold over one of the sides of fabric and secure with a paper clip:
hexagon mug rug 1

Cut a length of thread about 12” long, and make a big knot in one end, leaving a tail of about 2”. I knot mine 3 times in the same place. Thread the other end onto your needle, then fold over the adjacent side of fabric while holding it in place with your thumb:

And make a stitch through the layers to keep it all together. Then go back and do another stitch because we’re paranoid and want the sides to be held firmly:
hexie mug rug tutorial 4

If you are making large hexies, you can add a tiny stitch in the middle of each side to ensure it all stays together:
hexagon mug rug tutorial 3

When you have them all basted together you simply snip the threads and those tiny stitches will come out just fine.

Continue to fold and sew the edges down until you reach the first one. Bring the thread up right next to your 2” tail and tie a square knot. That’s it!

For this mug rug you’ll need 31 hexies. Once you have them all laid out, you can start stitching them together. I’ll warn you, this stage isn’t quite as fun as basting them, but you will be very proud when you get it done. And then you’ll probably start another. I pressed all mine before joining them so the folds were nice and straight.

Start stitching them together in vertical rows. Simply hold them with RST in your hand and slipstitch the edges together:
hexie mug rug tutorial 5

Once you have your rows, you’ll need to join them together. We’ll do this in basically the same way. Hold the edges which need to be joined together in your hand while you slipstitch the edges. ‘Lock in’ the edges with a couple of extra stitches. The pictures show how to do it:
hexie mug rug tutorial 6

hexagon mug rug tutorial 7

hexagon mug rug tutorial 8

hexagon mug rug tutorial 9

Once you get done with the first side of the top hexi, readjust the whole thing so you can stitch the next sides together, and so on all the way down to the bottom. I recommend you join them together in rows of two, then stitch the rows together.
hexie mug rug tutorial 10

hexagon mug rug tutorial 11

hexagon mug rug tutorial 12

When you are ready to baste your mug rug, take the papers out. If you put the tiny stitches in the middle of each edge, carefully snip the basting threads and gently take them out:
hexy mug rug tutorial 14

hexagon mug rug tutorial 13

The other basting threads can stay in. Baste and quilt as desired. I quilted 1/4″ along the vertical seams.
hexagon mug rug tutorial 14

Then trim the excess off with a rotary cutter. On the top and bottom I trimmed the very top ones in half, but on the sides I just cut off the outside angle:
hexagon mug rug tutorial 15

Now you just need to bind it, and I have a tutorial for that too: SewHappyGeek binding tutorial. And if you make one, I’d be thrilled if you add it to the SHG Flickr page!
Hexy Mug Rug 16

hexy mug rug tutorial 17

hexy mug rug 18

© Copyright J C Excell, 2011. You are welcome to use any SewHappyGeek tutorial for personal use. You are even welcome to make a couple to sell, but you are not given permission to use my pictures or my words without giving me credit and linking back to the original. Sometimes my pictures have my family in them and they are never intended for public use. Also, I work very hard to provide free tutorials for my lovely readers, and anyone copying or selling my tutorials is guilty of copyright infringement. This website is protected by Copyscape and is checked regularly.

Posted in Mug Rug Tutorial, Tutorial Tuesday, Tutorials, UK craft blog, UK quilt blog, UK sewing blog | Tagged , , , , , | 7 Comments

Tutorial Tue: Hexagon Mug Rug

So today I’ll be showing you how to make this:
hexy mug rug tutorial 17
over at my good friend Bonnie’s blog, Wonderfully Awkward. Quick Warning: once you start making hexies you’ll find it very, very hard to stop!
So go on over to Wonderfully Awkward for the Hexagon Mug Rug Tutorial!

If you’d like to leave a link in this week’s Manic Monday Linky Party, don’t worry – it’s still open!

Thanks!

© J C Excell, 2011

Posted in UK craft blog | Tagged , , , , , | 4 Comments